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Announcing the Release of a New CJJR Paper

 

“Improving the Effectiveness of Juvenile Justice Programs: A New Perspective on Evidence-Based Practice,” a paper co-authored by Dr. Mark W. Lipsey, Dr. James C. (Buddy) Howell, Marion R. Kelly, Gabrielle Chapman and Darin Carver. The paper was released at a symposium on December 3.

The paper presents a new approach to evidence-based practice that has the potential to produce better outcomes for youth involved in the juvenile justice system. The paper begins with an overview of the different approaches to evidence-based practice and introduces a tool Dr. Lipsey has developed to better make use of our vast knowledge base. It then embeds this new approach within a comprehensive juvenile justice framework that will allow our increased knowledge to benefit the entire juvenile justice continuum, rather than a handful programs serving a limited number of youth.

This paper serves as a launching point for a new portfolio of work at CJJR. Beginning in January 2011, CJJR will launch the Juvenile Justice System Improvement Project to work with three states to implement the approach detailed in the paper.

Resources:
“Improving the Effectiveness of Juvenile Justice Programs: A New Perspective on Evidence-Based Practice” is available online at
http://cjjr.georgetown.edu/resources.html

Monday, December 20, 2010 at 10:31 AM

OJJDP Bulletin Provides Overview of Gang Prevention Research

 

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has published "Gang Prevention: An Overview of Research and Programs." The bulletin presents an overview of gang research and programs in the United States and examines how gangs form and why youth join them. It also describes how community members can start assessing their gang problems and enhance prevention and intervention activities to help prevent delinquency and gang violence. The author identifies promising and effective programs for gang prevention.

Resources:
"Gang Prevention: An Overview of Research and Programs" (NCJ 231116) is available at www.ojjdp.gov/publications/PubAbstract.asp?pubi=253165.

Friday, December 17, 2010 at 11:40 AM

Webinar Evidence-based Case Management Practice Jan. 27 & 28, 2011

 

The Joyfield Institute for Professional Research will present a webinar on Evidence-based Practices for Effective Case Management

Dates: January 27 & 28, 2011
Times: 2:00 - 4:00 PM EST

Join online for this webinar presented by Mark Lowis, LMSW, MINT, President, MML Consulting, Inc. to learn evidence-based practices for this specialty area in human services.

Resources:
To learn more about this Webinar and register online, visit http://www.joyfields.org/trn/web/cm.html

Thursday, December 16, 2010 at 10:35 AM

MacArthur Foundation December 2010 Newsletter

 

The MacArthur Foundation December 2010 Newsletter on America's Fiscal Future is now available online at
http://www.kintera.org/cms.asp?id=1323624&campaign_id=152729&enString=x#feature

Wednesday, December 15, 2010 at 11:09 AM

American Prospect Report on Mass Incarceration in America

 

This special report from The American Prospect magazine Mass Incarceration in America includes essays from journalists and criminal justice experts on the policies that have contributed to the nation’s high rate of incarceration and the subsequent impact on youth and low-income communities of color in particular.

Kara Gotsch, Director of Advocacy for The Sentencing Project, contributed to the special report. Her article, “Bipartisan Justice” reviews the recent history of national criminal justice policy making, both punitive and progressive, and concludes that any movement to advance justice reform must incorporate a bipartisan strategy.

Resources:
"Mass Incarceration in America"
is available online at
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/americanprospect/20110102specialreport/#/0

Monday, December 13, 2010 at 2:25 PM

Report Offers Information on School Crime and Victimization

 

The Office of Justice Programs' Bureau of Justice Statistics, in collaboration with the National Center for Education Statistics, has published the report, "Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2010"

The report draws on federally funded studies to present detailed statistical information about the crime that occurs in school and on the way to and from school. It presents data from the perspectives of students, teachers, and principals. Topics addressed include bullying, victimization, fights, weapons, drug and alcohol use by students, school conditions, and student perceptions of personal safety.

Resources:
"Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2010" is available online at bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/content/pub/pdf/iscs10.pdf.

Thursday, December 09, 2010 at 12:56 PM

Webinar to Discuss the Effects of Childhood Trauma in Girl's Lives

 

On December 14, 2010, at 2 p.m. E.T., the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office on Women's Health will present a Webinar on the effects of trauma over girls' lifespans.

Lifecourse Effects of Trauma in the Lives of Girls: Findings from the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study will explore the frequency of trauma in girls' childhood and discuss how that trauma affects women's physical and mental health and behavior. Participants will learn best practices in trauma-informed care and identify ways to integrate these practices when providing services to trauma victims.

Resources:
To learn more about this Webinar and register online, visit https://services.choruscall.com/links/womenshealth.html

Tuesday, December 07, 2010 at 4:35 PM

FACJJ Issues 2010 Annual Report

 

The Federal Advisory Committee on Juvenile Justice (FACJJ) has published its 2010 Annual Report to the President and Congress. The report addresses significant issues facing our nation's juvenile justice system. Primary among its concerns, FACJJ urges reauthorization of the JJDP Act.

Wednesday, November 24, 2010 at 12:23 PM

OJJDP Ad Campaign Urges Prospective Mentors To Step Up to the Plate

 

Mentoring programs have been shown to build self-esteem, enhance academic performance, and improve behavior. The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has long supported mentoring as an effective way to prevent at-risk youth from becoming involved in delinquency.

Continuing its Be a Mentor campaign, OJJDP expects to reach some 3.5 million people through its ad in the game programs for Major League Baseball's 2010 American League and National League Championship Series and the World Series. The ad, which invites adults to "Step Up to the Plate" by becoming a mentor, will also appear in the program for the 2011 All-Star game.

A newly created page on the OJJDP Web site provides visitors with an array of resources related to mentoring.

Resources:
For information about mentoring-related resources, visit http://www.ojjdp.gov/programs/mentoring.html

Wednesday, October 27, 2010 at 2:31 PM

Report Reviews Victimization in Juvenile Detention

 

The Department of Justice's Review Panel on Prison Rape has released its Report on Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Correction Facilities.

In compliance with the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003, the Review Panel conducted public hearings and gathered data based on the survey described in the Bureau of Justice Statistics report Sexual Victimization In Juvenile Facilities Reports by Youth, 2008-09.

The Review Panel's report provides observations and recommendations to assist practitioners and advocates in preventing sexual victimization in the nation's juvenile correctional facilities.

Resources:
"Report on Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Correctional Facilities" is available online at www.ojp.usdoj.gov/reviewpanel/pdfs/panelreport101014.pdf

Monday, October 25, 2010 at 12:19 PM

Juvenile Justice Briefing Scheduled for Capitol Hill

 

On October 26, 2010, at 10:00 a.m. E.T., in Washington, DC, the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy will conduct the congressional briefing, "Juvenile Justice in the Age of the Second Chance Act, the Youth Promise Act, and the JJDP Reauthorization Bill: Research Guided Policy Implications for Maximizing Reentry Initiatives for Adolescents."

The 2-½-hour briefing, which is being cosponsored by the Center for Justice Leadership and Management, will be held in the Capitol Visitor Center. It will be led by Dr. Catherine Gallagher, Associate Professor, Department of Criminology, Law and Society, George Mason University, and feature briefs on key topics from 12 experts in research and policy, including staff from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Registration is free but required. Resources: To obtain additional information about the briefing and register online, visit gemini.gmu.edu/cebcp/Briefings/juvenilejustice.html.

Tuesday, October 19, 2010 at 4:01 PM

Webcast To Address Bullying Prevention

 

On October 27, 2010, at 1:00 p.m. E.T. The Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention Working Group will air a Webcast on bullying prevention.

A follow up to the recent Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention Summit, the 90-minute session will feature presentations by:

  • Dr. Catherine Bradshaw, Associate Director, Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence

  • Kevin Jenkins, Assistant Deputy Secretary, Office of Safe and Drug Free Schools, U.S. Department of Education

  • Capt. Stephanie Bryn, Director, Injury and Violence, Prevention Programs, Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

A panel of individuals involved in bullying prevention efforts will discuss the challenges that they have encountered and the successes that they have achieved.

The registration deadline is October 25, 2010; however, early registration is recommended as the capacity to participate in the Webcast is limited.

Resources:
Register online at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register827891504.

Questions regarding the Webcast or the registration process may be addressed to Andrea Massengile at amassengile@icfi.com

Thursday, October 14, 2010 at 5:03 PM

Jetson Center for Youth Praised for Work

 

Renis Waters III returned Thursday to Jetson Center for Youth, but this time he came as a visitor to the state’s juvenile secure-care facility and not because of a judge’s orders.

Waters, 18, of Westwego, returned with his parents in tow, Nicole and Renis Waters Sr., to collect his class ring during a ceremony at the facility honoring students who earned their GEDs while serving sentences at the facility.

State Superintendent of Education Paul Pastorek was the featured speaker at the event.

But the program was run by some of Jetson’s teenage wards, all wearing dress slacks and polo shirts, who read poetry, sang songs and introduced the speakers.

The other teens who call Jetson home, all wearing T-shirts and jeans, sat attentively in the audience.

“I love these days,” said Daron Brown, director of Jetson. “We get to showcase our kids, and we’re really proud of them.”

Brown said there is no difference between other teenagers and the teenagers at Jetson, which is home to about 75 boys and young men ranging in ages from 13 to 20 who ran afoul of the law.

“Our kids have made a mistake,” Brown said. “But they’re working hard to overcome that.”

When Waters walked to the podium to get his high school class ring, the other boys cheered and applauded, almost as loudly as his parents.

“I never thought we’d see this day two years ago,” Waters’ mother said. “He was not going anywhere.”

That’s when young Waters ended up at Jetson after he fired a gun inside city limits when he was 16 years old.

“Back then, I was sleeping all of the time and just getting into trouble,” Waters said. “I decided I didn’t want to be like that anymore.”

While at Jetson, Waters said, he discovered he has artistic capabilities.

“One of his pictures was displayed in a local hotel,” his mother said. “I am so proud of him.”

And now Waters is attending classes at a college where he is focusing on art.

“He’s just changed so much,” Nicole Waters said. “And, oh my gosh, I give all of the credit to Jetson.”

She said Jetson counselors spent hours and hours of “one-on-one time” with her son, helping him work through his problems.

“This was it for him,” she said, indicating Jetson was her son’s last hope for straightening out.

But praise for the facility, which was built in the 1940s and has housed juvenile delinquents since then, has been sparse over the years.

About four years ago, Jetson was removed from federal court supervision, where it was placed in the late 1990s because of violence and abuse.

During the past two years, great strides have been made to reform the facility, said Jerel Giarrusso, a spokeswoman for the state Office of Juvenile Justice.

Gone are the razor wire fences that once surrounded each building. Now there are picnic tables on grassy areas landscaped with flowers, trees and shrubs.

Also gone are the color-coded T-shirts that identified what offense each boy committed, including sex offenders.

Another significant change is the number of boys. Only a few years ago, more than 200 boys were housed there; now, that’s been reduced to about 75.

The facility now is operated using a therapeutic approach rather than a correctional approach, Giarrusso said.

“Things are just much, much better out here,” she said.

Source:
http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/103686579.html?showAll=y&c=y

Wednesday, October 13, 2010 at 5:27 PM

Factors Related to Employment and Housing Outcomes of Public Mental Health Consumers

 

The Washington State Institute for Public Policy (Institute) has recently posted the following publications online:

http://www.wsipp.wa.gov/rptfiles/10-08-3401.pdf

The Institute was directed by the 2001 Washington State Legislature to “conduct a longitudinal study of long-term [mental health] client outcomes to assess any changes in client status at two, five, and ten years.” This latest report discusses supported employment and housing outcomes for Washington’s public mental health consumers.

The study discusses that employment history, diagnosis, and functioning all predict the likelihood of employment after treatment; earnings for employed adults remain low; and supported employment and housing programs can improve outcomes for clients if implemented according to recommended guidelines.

Wednesday, September 01, 2010 at 5:15 PM

National Academy for State Health Policy Preconference on Juvenile Justice

 

The National Academy for State Health Policy is pleased to announce that we are hosting a preconference session on juvenile justice and behavioral health issues in conjunction with our 23rd Annual State Health Policy Conference on Monday, October 4th in New Orleans, LA. A brief description is below and the session agenda can be found at: http://www.nashpconference.org/agenda/preconferences/. We hope you will share this with your networks and others!

Preconference Description: Young people in the juvenile justice system are among our nation's most vulnerable, facing many behavioral and physical health care problems. In order to meet the complex needs of these youth, states engage multiple systems of care, including Medicaid, mental health and even child welfare systems. During this day-long session participants will have the opportunity to engage in interactive sessions that explore successful models for delivering evidence-based strategies; the role officials and policymakers have in administering these programs in a health reform environment; and promising practices that address the challenges associated with building state, local, and community-based collaborations. Speakers will include state and national experts working to improve the health and well-being of juvenile justice-involved youth. This preconference is geared toward policymakers, officials, researchers and advocates from juvenile justice, mental health, substance abuse, and Medicaid.

Monday, August 30, 2010 at 11:08 AM

OJJDP Bulletin Examining Juvenile Transfer Laws Now Available in Print

 

Originally released online in 2008, the OJJDP bulletin "Juvenile Transfer Laws: An Effective Deterrent to Delinquency?" is now available for the first time in print.

The bulletin provides an overview of research on the deterrent effects of transferring youth from juvenile to criminal courts, focusing on large-scale, comprehensive, OJJDP-funded studies on the effect of transfer laws on recidivism. The information it provides should help inform public discussion and policy decisions.

Resources:

"Juvenile Transfer Laws: An Effective Deterrent to Delinquency?" is available online at: http://www.ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/publications/PubAbstract.asp?pubi=242419.

Print copies can be ordered online from the National Criminal Justice Reference Service.

Thursday, August 19, 2010 at 10:23 AM

Brief Examines Relationship Between Childhood Trauma and Juvenile Justice Involvement

 

The Justice Policy Institute has released "Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense."

The brief examines the relationship between childhood trauma and involvement in the juvenile justice system. According to the brief, while research shows that up to 34 percent of children in the United States have experienced at least one traumatic event, between 75 and 93 percent of youth entering the juvenile justice system annually are estimated to have experienced some degree of trauma.

Resources:
"Healing Invisible Wounds: Why Investing in Trauma-Informed Care for Children Makes Sense" is available online at www.justicepolicy.org/images/upload/10-07REPHealingInvisibleWounds_JJ-PS.pdf. For further information about the brief, see the Justice Policy Institute's press release at www.justicepolicy.org/content-hmID=1811&smID=1581&ssmID=102.htm#press.

Tuesday, July 20, 2010 at 3:53 AM

New Report Urges Cost-effective Reforms of Juvenile Justice Systems

 

Treating Juveniles in Community-Based Programs and Downsizing Institutions Most Cost-Effective Way to Rehabilitate Youth

WASHINGTON, D.C. - With many states facing alarming budget shortfalls, now is the time for cost-effective strategies to improve and shrink juvenile justice systems, according to a new report from the National Juvenile Justice Network (NJJN). The Real Costs and Benefits of Change: Finding Opportunities for Reform During Difficult Fiscal Times, explores an array of reforms that states have successfully utilized to improve outcomes for youth, increase public safety, and reduce costs.

The report highlights concrete strategies, both substantive and tactical, that have been proven to save states money and treat youth more appropriately and effectively. One such strategy is to adopt a fiscal realignment model, through which states provide incentives to encourage localities to treat young offenders through community- and evidence-based programs, and decrease their use of costly state-funded juvenile prison beds. Programs such as this in Ohio, Wisconsin, Illinois, and California have saved states significant amounts of money while improving outcomes for kids.

"Rather than indiscriminately cutting juvenile justice funding, we can use the current budget crisis as an opportunity to serve youth better by rethinking our current modes of spending," says Betsy Clarke, co-chair of NJJN. "By spending wisely, states can both save money and have better outcomes for youth, families and communities." NJJN also uses the report to demonstrate the cost-effectiveness of "downsizing" through closing youth correctional centers or lowering detention populations. Oregon, Rhode Island, Washington, and New Mexico, all have realized significant savings from downsizing. A growing body of research also points to the harmful effects of institutionalization on youth and the effectiveness of community-based programming. Studies have found that placing youth in "training schools" and other juvenile facilities increases their chance of future delinquent and adult criminal behavior, disrupts normal development and educational progress, and negatively impacts short- and long-term employment opportunities for youth.

According to Abby Anderson, co-chair of NJJN, the urgency of the changes cited in the report has been heightened by the current fiscal crisis. While many of these reforms were instituted before the current financial meltdown, their cost-savings benefits have become even more salient.

"This is documented proof that states must stop wasteful spending on archaic and expensive juvenile prisons, which can cost as much as $800 a day, or more than $290,000 per year to house just one youth," said Anderson. "Not only are these practices expensive, but they are also ineffective. The juvenile justice system's goal should be rehabilitation, and we know that community-based services are much more effective in helping kids get back on track."

NJJN urges advocates to help educate their local policymakers around the expense and disastrous effects of juvenile institutions and with the existence of sensible alternatives that will both achieve cost-cutting goals and increase public safety.

About the National Juvenile Justice Network: The National Juvenile Justice Network is a membership organization of state-based juvenile justice coalitions and organizations that advocate for state and federal laws, policies and practices that are fair, equitable and developmentally appropriate for all children, youth and families involved in, or at risk of becoming involved in, the justice system. For more information about NJJN, please visit www.njjn.org and/or email info@njjn.org.

Tuesday, July 20, 2010 at 3:45 AM

Report Provides Data and Trends in Juvenile Court Cases

 

The National Center for Juvenile Justice has published "Juvenile Court Statistics, 2006-2007," which was developed with funding from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Drawing on data from the National Juvenile Court Data Archive, the report profiles the nearly 1.7 million delinquency cases handled each year by U.S. courts with juvenile jurisdiction in 2006 and 2007. It also describes trends in delinquency cases processed by juvenile courts between 1985 and 2007 and status offense cases handled between 1995 and 2007.

Resources:
"Juvenile Court Statistics 2006-2007" is available online, via OJJDP's Statistical Briefing Book, at: ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/ojstatbb/publications/StatBBAbstract.asp?BibID=252137.

Thursday, July 01, 2010 at 6:53 AM

Integrating Family-focused Approaches In juvenile Justice Reform

 

A recent publication about the development of the Juvenile Relational Inquiry Tool in the Child Welfare League of America's publication. Read full article here.

Thursday, July 01, 2010 at 5:21 AM

OJJDP Fact Sheets Offer Information on Juveniles in Court

 

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has released four fact sheets providing data derived from the report "Juvenile Court Statistics 2006-2007." Resources:

Print copies of "Delinquency Cases in Juvenile Court, 2007" may be ordered at www.ncjrs.gov/App/ShoppingCart/ShopCart.aspx?item=NCJ+230168.

Thursday, July 01, 2010 at 5:12 AM

CJCA's Comments on Standards for the Prevention, Detention, Response and Monitoring of Sexual Abuse in Juvenile Facilities.

 

The top priority of all directors, managers and staff of juvenile facilities is ensuring safety – public safety in the community and the safety of youths and staff within facilities. The personal commitment to youths’ safety by juvenile correctional professionals is magnified by the parens patriae role assumed by agency and facility staff as guardians of youths committed to their custody by courts. The systemic commitment to safety is the critical  foundation for establishing a safe environment necessary for effective rehabilitative programming, skill development and education to prevent future crime. With these guiding principles as introduction of our organization’s philosophy, the Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators (CJCA) respectfully submits the comments below to the proposed Standards for the Prevention, Detection, Response and Monitoring of Sexual Abuse in Juvenile Facilities as proposed by the National Prison Rape Elimination Commission (NPREC.) Read more.

Submitted to Department of Justice by CJCA on May 10, 2010.

Monday, June 07, 2010 at 6:15 AM

Paper Addresses Educational Challenges Facing System-Involved Youth

 

Georgetown Public Policy Institute's Center for Juvenile Justice Reform has released the paper "Addressing the Unmet Educational Needs of Children and Youth in the Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare Systems."

Written by Peter Leone, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, and Lois Weinberg, California State University, Los Angeles, CA, the paper reviews educational barriers encountered by youth involved in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems and describes recent legal and policy reforms.

Promising practices and evidence-based interventions to improve educational outcomes for these system-involved youth are also provided.

Resources:
"Addressing the Unmet Educational Needs of Children and Youth in the Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare Systems" is available online at cjjr.georgetown.edu/pdfs/ed/edpaper.pdf.

Tuesday, May 25, 2010 at 5:20 AM

Bulletin Describes Results of Youth Survey on Conditions of Confinement

 

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has published "Conditions of Confinement: Findings From the Survey of Youth in Residential Placement."

The third in a publication series derived from findings from the Survey of Youth in Residential Placement, this OJJDP bulletin describes the characteristics of the facilities in which youth are confined and the programs that serve them.

Resources:
"Conditions of Confinement: Findings From the Survey of Youth in Residential Placement" (NCJ 227729) is available online at ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/publications/PubAbstract.asp?pubi=249736.

Print copies may be ordered at
www.ncjrs.gov/App/ShoppingCart/ShopCart.aspx?item=NCJ+227729.

For an overview of the series, see "Introduction to the Survey of Youth in Residential Placement" at ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/publications/PubAbstract.asp?pubi=240090.

Tuesday, May 18, 2010 at 11:44 AM

OJJDP Bulletin Reports on Youth in Custody's Needs and Services

 

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has published "Youth's Needs and Services: Findings From the Survey of Youth in Residential Placement."

The Survey of Youth in Residential Placement is the first national study to gather information on youth in custody by surveying detained offenders. The second in a series, the bulletin reports on the survey's findings on youth in custody's needs and the services they receive.

Resources:
"Youth's Needs and Services: Findings From the Survey of Youth in Residential Placement" is available online at ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/publications/PubAbstract.asp?pubi=249735.

Print copies may be ordered at www.ncjrs.gov/App/ShoppingCart/ShopCart.aspx?item=NCJ+227728.

For an overview of the series, see "Introduction to the Survey of Youth in Residential Placement" at ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/publications/PubAbstract.asp?pubi=240090.

Tuesday, April 06, 2010 at 7:40 AM

March 22-26 Is National Youth Violence Prevention Week

 

March 22-26, 2010, is National Youth Violence Prevention Week. Youth violence refers to harmful behaviors that can start early and continue into young adulthood. The young person may be a victim, an offender, or a witness to the violence.

While violence impacts people of all ages, violence disproportionately affects youth and is the second leading cause of death for young people between the ages of 10 and 24. Because of the multiple factors that contribute to the development of violence, a comprehensive preventative approach is needed. Youth violence prevention also requires collaboration among justice, public safety, education, public health, and human service agencies, with the support of community leaders, businesses, and faith-based organizations.

Resources:
To access information and resources related to youth violence, visit the National Criminal Justice Reference Service's Youth Violence portal page at www.ncjrs.gov/yviolence/.

For additional information, please visit www.safeyouth.org/scripts/index.asp.

Wednesday, March 24, 2010 at 9:10 AM

OJJDP Fact Sheet Addresses Girls' Delinquency

 

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has published Girls' Delinquency

This 4-page In Focus fact sheet reviews trends in girls' delinquency and describes research conducted by OJJDP's Girls Study Group. It also reports on OJJDP programs and publications that address girls' delinquency.

Resources:
"Girls' Delinquency” (NCJ 228414) is available at http://ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/publications/PubAbstract.asp?pubi=250433.

Print copies may be ordered online at www.ncjrs.gov/App/ShoppingCart/ShopCart.aspx?item=NCJ+228414&repro=0.

For further information about girls' delinquency, visit OJJDP's Girls' Delinquency page at ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/programs/girlsdelinquency.html.

Monday, March 15, 2010 at 8:02 AM

Fact Sheet Confirms Continued Decline in Number of Juveniles in Residential Placement

 

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention has published Juveniles in Residential Placement, 1997–2008. Data cited in this fact sheet are derived from the Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement and the Juvenile Residential Facility Census, both of which include 1-day counts of the juvenile placement population.

As the fact sheet confirms, the number of juvenile offenders in residential placement in publicly and privately operated juvenile facilities has declined steadily since 2000. In 2008, fewer than 81,000 juvenile offenders were housed in residential facilities at the time of the census, the lowest number since 1993.

Resources:
"Juveniles in Residential Placement, 1997–2008" is available online at www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/229379.pdf.

Print copies may be ordered online at www.ncjrs.gov/App/ShoppingCart/ShopCart.aspx?item=NCJ+229379&repro.

Monday, March 01, 2010 at 4:42 AM

CJCA’s First Annual Yearbook Cover Contest is in Progress!

 

On January 22, the Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators (CJCA) launched a national art contest for the cover of our annual Yearbook publication. The contest is seeking entries that interpret the following quote, “For a safer tomorrow, invest in our youths today.” This quote reflects CJCA’s support for investments in juvenile crime prevention and intervention programs as part of a comprehensive strategy to enhance public safety and improve outcomes for youths.

All youths committed to state juvenile corrections agencies are eligible to participate in the contest. Entries must be submitted by March 19. Click here to download the announcement and entry form.

Selections will be based on originality, quality of presentation and representation of the contest theme, “For a safer tomorrow, invest in our youths today.” Winning artwork will be featured on the cover of the 2010 CJCA Yearbook publication and gift cards for art supplies will be awarded. Winners will be announced in May 2010.

Questions?
Please contact Liz Mengers at 781-843-2663 or yearbook@cjca.net.

Wednesday, January 27, 2010 at 8:01 AM

Mayor Fenty Names Interim DYRS Director

 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Mayor Adrian M. Fenty today named Marc A. Schindler as interim director of the District’s Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services (DYRS). “Marc Schindler has a good working knowledge of the agency as well as best practices in the field of juvenile justice and youth development,” said Mayor Fenty. “And I am confident he will maintain the progress and growth of the agency until a permanent director is in place.” Marc A. Schindler, Esq. Interim Director, Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services

Schindler has played an integral part of DYRS’s management team since March 2005. Prior to his appointment as interim director, Schindler served as chief of staff to the director since 2006, assisting with overall management of the agency and reforms, and was the agency’s point person on issues related to professional development, communications, legislative relations and internal investigations. He’s also served as DYRS’ first general counsel from 2005-2006, following the establishment of DYRS as a cabinet level agency. Prior to joining DYRS, Schindler served as a staff attorney with the Youth Law Center (YLC), a national public interest civil rights law firm dedicated to protecting the rights of young people in juvenile justice and child welfare systems nationwide, from 1997 to 2005. While at YLC he was involved with training, technical assistance, law reform litigation, and legislative and administrative advocacy on legal issues related to children, with emphasis on improving the conditions of confinement for institutionalized children and addressing racial disparities in the justice system.

As an attorney with the YLC, he was involved in extensive advocacy on behalf of children in juvenile justice systems throughout the country, including in Maryland, Virginia, and the District.

Schindler also served as co-chair of the national Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention Coalition in DC and was a founding member of the Justice for DC Youth Coalition, and taught children’s rights at American University’s Washington College of Law. Schindler has served on numerous boards and commissioners including:

  • American Bar Association Juvenile Justice Committee (1993-2005)
  • DC Police Complaints Board (2003-2005)
  • Maryland Governor’s Task Force on Juvenile Justice (1996)
  • Committee for Baltimore’s Children (1995)

In addition, Schindler has worked as an assistant public defender in Baltimore's juvenile court representing children in delinquency proceedings, where he was the recipient of the Cahill Award for outstanding commitment to service and chaired the Juvenile Law Committee of the Baltimore City Bar Association.

A graduate of Yale University and the University of Maryland School of Law, Schindler began his career more than 20 years ago. He has lived in the District for more than 10 years, currently residing in the Woodridge neighborhood with his wife and two children.

Tuesday, January 12, 2010 at 9:28 AM

National Reentry Resource Center Announces Second Chance Act Grant Webinar: Guidance for Reentry Demonstration Project Applicants

 

The National Reentry Resource Center will conduct a free webinar to help applicants respond to the Second Chance Act Section 101 solicitation for state and local reentry demonstration projects,which was released on December 22, 2009, by the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). Le'Ann Duran, director of the resource center, will host the webinar, which will feature Dr. Gary Dennis, BJA senior policy advisor for corrections, and Thomas Murphy, OJJDP state representative, who will explain the solicitation and application process and answer common questions. (The grant application deadline is March 4, 2010.)

The webinar, supported by the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance, will be held at 2:00 P.M. (E.T.) on Thursday, January 14, 2010.

To register for the webinar, click here.

In 2009, the Council of State Governments Justice Center, with funding support from the Public Welfare Foundation, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, and the Open Society Institute, developed a Reentry Checklist for state and local governments, and a Second Chance Act Fact Sheet for the reentry field. The resource center recently updated these materials.

The resource center is continually updating its website with materials relevant to the reentry field. To learn more about the resource center, including how to upload content to the site, please click here.

Friday, January 08, 2010 at 7:03 AM

SAMHSA Seeks Applicants for Juvenile Treatment Drug Courts Program

 

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is accepting applications for Grants to Expand Substance Abuse Treatment Capacity for Juvenile Treatment Drug Courts.

The purpose of this program is to expand and enhance substance abuse treatment services in problem-solving courts that use the juvenile drug court model to provide alcohol and drug treatment, recovery support services supporting substance abuse treatment, screening, assessment, case management, and program coordination to juvenile defendants and offenders. Priority should be given to addressing gaps in the existing continuum of treatment.

Eligibility is restricted to current juvenile treatment drug courts or tribal, state, and local governmental proxies that may apply on their behalf. Grantees from the 2009 cohort of this program are ineligible. Applications must be received by February 23, 2010.

Resources:
For additional information about this funding opportunity, visit www.samhsa.gov/Grants/2010/TI-10-004.aspx.

Tuesday, January 05, 2010 at 4:05 AM

Applicants Sought for Reentry Demonstration Projects

 

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) and the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) invite applicants from state and local government agencies and federally recognized Indian tribes under their joint Second Chance Act Adult and Juvenile Offender Reentry Demonstration Projects solicitation.

The Second Chance Act is intended to support the reentry of adult and juvenile offenders from prison, jail, or juvenile residential facilities into their communities.

The application deadline is March 4, 2010.

Resources:
For further information about this solicitation, see the Program Announcement at ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/grants/solicitations/FY2010/SecondChanceMentoring.pdf.

Questions regarding the juvenile-related requirements of this solicitation should be addressed to Thomas Murphy, Grants Program Specialist, at thomas.murphy@usdoj.gov or 202-353-8734.

Questions regarding any other requirement of this solicitation, contact Dr. Gary L. Dennis, Senior Policy Advisor for Corrections, at gary.dennis@usdoj.gov or 202-305-9059.

Monday, December 28, 2009 at 4:55 AM

CJCA White Paper on Recidivism

 

CJCA is pleased to announce completion of the most recent white paper, Defining and Measuring Recidivism, which was reviewed and agreed upon at the 2nd Annual Leadership Conference in Chicago. The paper is a product of the proceedings of the Recidivism Committee created by CJCA President Bernard Warner and chaired by CJCA Vice President Barry Stoodley. The paper contains recommended national standards for measuring recidivism in the juvenile justice system.

Wednesday, December 09, 2009 at 7:12 AM

OJJDP Invites Comments on Proposed FY 2010 Program Plan

 

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has published a Notice of its Proposed Plan for Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 in the December 1, 2009, Federal Register. The Proposed Plan describes discretionary program activities that OJJDP proposes to carry out during FY 2010.

Taking into consideration comments received and its final FY 2010 appropriation, OJJDP will develop a Final Plan describing program activities that the Office intends to fund during FY 2010. The Final Plan will be published in the Federal Register.

Comments on the Proposed Plan must be received by January 15, 2010, and may be submitted online or mailed to OJJDP. As security protocols can significantly delay OJJDP's receipt of mail, online submission of comments is recommended to ensure their consideration.

Resources:
To view OJJDP's Proposed Plan and detailed guidance on submitting comments, visit ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/funding/FY10OJJDPProposedPlan.pdf.

Comments may be submitted online at www.regulations.gov/search/Regs/home.html#documentDetail?R=0900006480a61626.

A copy of the Proposed Plan is also accessible from this page.

Thursday, December 03, 2009 at 3:46 AM

Vincent N. Schiraldi Appointed as NYC Commissioner of the Department of Probation

 

New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg today appointed Vincent N. Schiraldi as Commissioner of the Department of Probation. Commissioner Schiraldi is a national leader in the field of rehabilitation, with more than 25 years of experience and a record of reform and success. He most recently led Washington, DC's Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services, where he turned a troubled agency that was on the verge of being placed under court supervision into a national model.

His reforms were recently recognized by Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government "Innovations in American Government" awards program for being among the "Top 50" most innovative programs in the country. He will replace Acting Commissioner Patricia Brennan, who has served ably as Acting Commissioner since the departure of Commissioner Martin Horn last summer and will return to her role as Deputy Commissioner for Juvenile Operations. The Mayor announced the appointment in the Blue Room of City Hall, where he was joined by Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services Linda I. Gibbs. Commissioner Schiraldi is expected to begin work at the Department of Probation in February.

"For nearly five years Vinny Schiraldi has been a tremendous asset to the District, aggressively reforming the city's juvenile justice system," said District of Columbia Mayor Adrian M. Fenty. "He's created and implemented innovative programs that will serve as national best practice models for years to come. Some of the District's most troubled youth have greatly benefited from his work and commitment during my Administration as well as the previous Williams Administration. I wish Schiraldi much success, and congratulate Mayor Bloomberg on an excellent choice for probation commissioner."

Commissioner Schiraldi founded the Center on Juvenile & Criminal Justice, a non-profit dedicated to reducing society's reliance on imprisonment as a solution to social problems. He has published more than 30 articles and has served on 10 boards and commissions in the field. His professional experience includes work as Director of the District of Columbia Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services, Founder and Executive Director of the Justice Policy Institute in Washington, DC, Western Regional Director of the National Center on Institutions and Alternatives in San Francisco, California, Case Developer at the National Center on Institutions and Alternatives in New York City, Houseparent/Recreation Coordinator at the New York State Division for Youth, Foster Parent at the San Francisco Department of Social Service and lecturer on juvenile justice reform at San Francisco State and Georgetown Universities.

The Department of Probation gives adult and juvenile offenders the tools they need to redirect their lives and holding them accountable if they fail to lead a law-abiding life. Probation works to strengthen families and reduce the number of juveniles removed from their homes. The department works with community groups and other criminal justice agencies, providing information and services to the courts and giving victims a voice in the justice system.

Wednesday, December 02, 2009 at 7:36 AM

W. Haywood Burns Institute Releases New Report

 

The W. Haywood Burns Institute, a leading organization in the field of juvenile justice and ethnic and racial disparities reduction, released The Keeper and the Kept, a report that examines local obstacles to reducing disparities in juvenile justice systems. The publication is the second in a series, following Adoration of the Question: Reflections on the Failure to Reduce Racial and Ethnic Desparities in Juvenile Justice Systems.

Tuesday, December 01, 2009 at 5:57 AM

Online Courses Train Juvenile Justice Managers

 

The National Juvenile Court Services Association has designed an online training curriculum to train juvenile justice managers. Sponsored by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the Professional Juvenile Justice Manager (PJMM) certificate program includes a series of online courses. Students will spend two weeks on each course, working on basic lecture material, specialized readings, and self-assessment questions.

The program is designed to train staff and to provide certification for supervisors currently in the field. Those who successfully complete the program will receive certification from the American Probation and Parole Association.

Resources:

To access a list of PJMM courses and register online, visit www.njcsacertification.org/course/ca tegory.php?id=29.

Tuesday, December 01, 2009 at 5:56 AM

SAMHSA Will Provide $39.6 Million To Support Juvenile and Adult Reentry and Recovery Services

 

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is currently accepting applications for the Offender Reentry Program. The purpose of the program is to expand or enhance substance abuse treatment and related recovery and reentry services to sentenced juvenile and adult offenders returning to the community from incarceration for criminal/juvenile offenses. Programs should help those who have been incarcerated make a stable transition back to the community, provide treatment for drug and alcohol abusers, and reduce future offending.

Grants will be awarded through SAMHSA's Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, for fiscal year 2010. The deadline for submitting applications is January 19. The full grant announcement is available online.

Resources:

Read the full grant announcement online at www.samhsa.gov/Grants/2010/TI-10-006.aspx.

For more information about SAMHSA, go to www.samhsa.gov.

Tuesday, December 01, 2009 at 5:55 AM

Briefing Advises House and Senate Members on Juvenile Justice Reentry Issues

 

On November 16, 2009, the Youth Reentry Task Force of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Coalition, along with the Sentencing Project and the National Alliance to End Homelessness, organized an educational panel to brief House and Senate members on the importance of meeting the needs of juveniles who reenter a community after a period of incarceration — a population consisting of about 100,000 youth a year. OJJDP Acting Administrator Jeff Slowikowski, who spoke at the briefing, emphasized the agency's commitment to supporting these youth, citing several OJJDP-sponsored programs and initiatives that have helped ex-offender youth find employment, complete education programs, and keep from reoffending.

Speakers reviewed best practices for service providers, federal laws that support reentry services, studies of reentry services that reduce recidivism, and current perspectives from the field. The speakers also made recommendations on how to bolster national policy to better support juveniles' reentry needs.

The task force also released a research report that outlines current findings on juvenile reentry issues.

Resources:

Read the research report online at www.sentencingproject.org/doc/publications/CC_youthreentryfall09report.pdf.

For more information about the Sentencing Project, visit www.sentencingproject.org.

For more information about the National Alliance to End Homelessness, visit www.naeh.org.

Tuesday, December 01, 2009 at 5:54 AM

Evaluation Finds that Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative Significantly Improves Student Safety

 

On November 3, 2009, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) issued the following press release:

Rockville, MD - In the wake of several recent highly-publicized stories about violence among school-aged children, a new report shows that school districts participating in the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative substantially improved the safety of their students. According to the report by SAMHSA, over a three-year period, school districts participating in the Safe Schools/Healthy Students grant program reported fewer students involved in violent incidents, decreased levels of experienced and witnessed violence, and improvements in overall school safety and violence prevention.

"Every child deserves to learn in a safe and healthy environment, and now through the results of the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative we know that we can take real steps to help them," said SAMHSA Acting Administrator Eric Broderick, D.D.S., M.P.H. "The positive impact for children, families and communities is unprecedented: lower rates of school violence, more mental health services for more children, better attendance, and improved academic performance."

Key findings from the Safe Schools/Healthy Students National Evaluation include:

  • A 15 percent decrease in the number of students involved in violent incidents during the grant period (from 17, 800 in year 1 to 15,163 in year 3).
  • A 12 percent decrease in the number of students reporting that they had experienced or witnessed violence from year 1 of the grant period to year 3.
  • Most staff at grantee schools reported that the Initiative had made their schools safer. By year 3 of the grant, 84 percent said the Initiative had improved school safety, 77 percent said it had reduced violence on campus, and 75 percent said it had reduced violence in the community.

The Safe Schools/Healthy Students program supports the implementation and enhancement of integrated, comprehensive community-wide plans that create safe and drug-free schools and promote healthy childhood development. Under the initiative, school districts, in partnership with local public mental-health agencies, law-enforcement and juvenile justice entities, must implement a comprehensive, community-wide plan that focuses on the following elements:

  • Safe school environments and violence prevention activities
  • Alcohol, tobacco and other drug prevention activities
  • Student behavioral, social and emotional supports
  • Mental health services
  • Early childhood social and emotional learning programs.

Since 1999, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the U.S. Department of Education, and the U.S. Department of Justice have implemented the Safe Schools/Healthy Students Initiative, which has provided more than $2.1 billion to local educational, mental health, law enforcement and juvenile justice partnerships. For more information on the Safe Schools/Healthy Students visit www.sshs.samhsa.gov/apply/default.aspx.

Resources:

Read the press release on SAMHSA's Web site at www.samhsa.gov/newsroom/advisories/0911033535.aspx.

Click here to read a data brief that describes the evaluation's findings.

Tuesday, November 17, 2009 at 5:00 AM

OJJDP Acting Administrator Slowikowski Invites Juvenile Justice Professionals to Complete a Needs Assessment

 

On October 26th, 2009, OJJDP's National Training and Technical Assistance Center launched the Training and Technical Assistance Needs Assessment, an online survey that asks participants to describe their training and technical assistance needs and preferences. OJJDP will use the information to better provide the juvenile justice community with the tools and resources they require to enhance their organizational capacity, and to develop new curricula and training programs that are timely and responsive.

OJJDP Acting Administrator Jeff Slowikowski has issued an open invitation to the juvenile justice community to complete the needs assessment. He remarked, "This is an exciting opportunity to hear the voice of the field."

It is OJJDP's hope that the needs assessment will foster greater awareness and understanding of the current issues in the field. A systematic, nationwide assessment such as this provides a rich dataset that can inform federal understanding of local needs and help community stakeholders build capacity and sustainability among juvenile justice organizations.

Resources:

The OJJDP Needs Assessment is available online at: www.nttac.org/JJNeedsAssessment.

Wednesday, November 11, 2009 at 2:39 AM

Attorney General Holder Welcomes Assistant Attorney General Laurie Robinson

 

On November 9, 2009, the Office of Justice Programs issued the following press release:

Washington, DC - Laurie O. Robinson was sworn in today as Assistant Attorney General in the U.S. Department of Justice's Office of Justice Programs (OJP).

"Laurie's commitment, leadership, experience, and knowledge of criminal justice issues will ensure that the Department of Justice works in partnership with the justice community to develop innovative, evidence-based strategies to prevent and reduce crime," Attorney General Holder said. "I look forward to once again working with Laurie."

The Office of Justice Programs provides federal leadership in developing the nation's capacity to prevent and control crime, administer justice, and assist victims. OJP has five component bureaus: the Bureau of Justice Assistance; the Bureau of Justice Statistics; the National Institute of Justice; the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention; and the Office for Victims of Crime. Additionally, OJP has two program offices: the Community Capacity Development Office, which incorporates the Weed and Seed strategy, and the Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking (SMART).

Ms. Robinson, who was confirmed by the United States Senate on November 5, 2009, previously served as the Assistant Attorney General of OJP from 1993 to February, 2000. Since 2004, Ms. Robinson has been the director of the Master of Science Program in the University of Pennsylvania's Department of Criminology. Also, since 2001, she has served as a Distinguished Senior Scholar in the University's Jerry Lee Center of Criminology, and as Executive Director of its Forum on Crime and Justice.

She has published numerous articles in criminal justice and legal periodicals, and has spoken at hundreds of criminal justice-related conferences and forums. Ms. Robinson is a magna cum laude graduate of Brown University and a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

Resources:

Read the full announcement at: www.ojp.usdoj.gov/newsroom/pressreleases/2009/ojp10017.htm.

Tuesday, November 10, 2009 at 9:24 AM

OJJDP Recognizes Baltimore City as Leader in DMC Reduction Programs

 

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention recognized Baltimore City's Pre-Adjudication Coordination & Transition Center (PACT Center) as one of its best practices for DMC reduction in 2009. Baltimore City is a DMC Action Network Partner Site. Officials and advocates in Baltimore City have something to celebrate: the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) recognized the city's Pre-Adjudication Coordination and Transition Center (PACT Center) with its 2009 Best Practices Award for DMC reduction. The program was one of three to receive the honor from OJJDP this year.



The PACT Center emerged from the recommendations of the city's DMC Advisory Board, which highlighted the need for additional community-based alternatives to secure detention. The program focuses on those youth who would otherwise be detained because of a lack of success in less intensive alternatives to detention.



Located in West Baltimore, the program provides support services to youth to ensure that they attend scheduled court hearings, avoid re-arrest, and appear in court with a comprehensive needs assessment and individualized plan that is designed to identify community resources that will help the youth avoid future delinquency. The PACT Center has successfully diverted over 300 African-American males from secure detention in the past two years.

Thursday, November 05, 2009 at 9:08 AM

Keeping Reforms on Track While Cutting Back: The Kansas Story

 

In the face of budget cuts, the Kansas Juvenile Justice Authority has managed to preserve its community-level services by reducing the number of secure correctional facilities throughout the state while also reducing the number of youth in correctional facilities system-wide. Some recent signs point to economic recovery, but state and local governments are still feeling the pinch of the recession. This past July, the New York Times reported that juvenile justice reform efforts were suffering, as “[a]cross the country, depleted coffers . . . prompted state and local officials to pare programs intended as alternatives to the mere incarceration of juvenile lawbreakers.”



Across Kansas, the state’s Juvenile Justice Authority (JJA) has an entirely different story to tell. Faced withbudget cuts, the JJA has not sacrificed its community-level programs, but has instead closed two secure correctional facilities to make ends meet.



Earlier projections estimated that approximately 700 youth would be in the state’s correctional facilities at this time. Today, the number is less than half that, and new estimates predict that the population will continue to fall below 300. According to Commissioner Jennings, “the reduced number is an indication of how we’ve strengthened community-level services and how community corrections partners have implemented evidence- and research-based practices. We’re demonstrating that believing, following, and selling research to key decision makers works.”



Reforms in Sedgwick County, the largest county in Kansas, have helped drive these results. In 2008, the county's use of objective detention screening, alternatives to detention and other strategies led to a 45% reduction in secure detention days. According to Mark Masterson, director of the county's Department of Corrections, the gains stem from "state and local partnerships, sustained leadership, commitment to the use of research-based practices, and making continuous improvements. Sustained commitment by the Legislature to fund prevention, intervention and graduated sanctions programming and shared decision-making and funding by local governing bodies has resulted in effective early assessment and intervention to reduce delinquency."



The budget crunch has also prompted officials to think creatively about uses for the two closed correctional facilities. After closing the Atchison Juvenile Correctional Facility, the JJA quickly contracted to convert the facility into a Youth Residential Center II, which provides treatment and programming to youth in a highly structured setting. Within seven months, the agency opened the doors to a non-secure 54-bed facility. Additionally, the JJA plans to introduce legislation in January to convey the land on which the Beloit Juvenile Correctional Facility is situated, which had been a gift from the city, back to the community. The JJA is also working with local officials on potential uses of the vacated facility.

In Kansas, JJA officials have responded to the financial crisis by reducing reliance on secure correctional facilities and prioritizing community-level programs. According to Commissioner Jennings, “This was a balancing that needed to occur. The positive side of the economic downturn is that it created the political will to do what should have been done before.”



Tell us how you’ve sustained DMC reduction efforts in light of budgetary challenges: email jszanyi@cclp.org.

Thursday, November 05, 2009 at 9:03 AM

Report on OJJDP's Tribal Youth Program Released at Capitol Hill Forum

 

On October 23, 2009, in Washington, DC, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) and the American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) hosted a forum featuring the report "Strengthening Indian Country Through Tribal Youth Programs."

Speakers included Jeff Slowikowski, Acting Administrator, OJJDP; Sarah Pearson, author, "Strengthening Indian Country Through Tribal Youth Programs;" David Fullerton, Cultural Resource Manager, Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde; Laura Ansera, Tribal Programs Coordinator; and Patrick Dunckhorst, Program Manager, OJJDP.

In describing the activities of five diverse sites, the report examines how the Tribal Youth Program is improving the lives of tribal youth and strengthening their families.

Resources:

For additional information about the forum, visit www.aypf.org/forumbriefs/2009/fb102309.htm.

To access the report, visit www.aypf.org/forumbriefs/2009/documents/TYPReportfinal.pdf.

A more comprehensive report will be issued later, as will be announced on JUVJUST.

Monday, October 26, 2009 at 5:57 AM

Web Forum To Discuss How To Help Children Exposed to Domestic Violence

 

On October 26, 2009, at 2 p.m. E.T., the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC), in collaboration with the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, will host a Web Forum to discuss best practices for helping children exposed to domestic violence.

The 1-hour session, which is cosponsored by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), will be led by Sherry Hamby, Ph.D., coauthor of the OJJDP Bulletin "Children's Exposure to Violence: A Comprehensive National Survey," and Miriam Berkman, J.D., M.S.W., coordinator of the Child Development-Community Policing Program's Domestic Violence Intervention Project.

Resources:

Further information about this OVC Web Forum, including instructions on how to participate, is available at ovc.ncjrs.gov/ovcproviderforum.

For additional information about children's exposure to violence, visit OJJDP's Safe Start Center at www.safestartcenter.org/.

Monday, October 26, 2009 at 5:56 AM

Vera Announces Creation of Cost-Benefit "Knowledge Bank"

 

NEW YORK – The Vera Institute of Justice today announced the development of a national Knowledge Bank for Cost-Benefit Analysis in Criminal Justice to inform practitioners and policymakers about the budgetary impacts of criminal justice policy choices. The Knowledge Bank, a project of Vera’s Cost-Benefit Analysis Unit (CBAU), will provide decision makers with tools to help incorporate cost-benefit analysis into policy development.

“Cost-benefit analysis is quickly becoming an integral part of how policymakers evaluate programs and policy initiatives,” said Mike Jacobson, director of the Vera Institute of Justice. “Governments are trying to improve outcomes while facing chronic budget pressures and limited resources. The Knowledge Bank will provide tools to do that, improving the return on investment that state and local governments receive from their justice system expenditures.”

The Knowledge Bank project is funded by an innovation grant awarded to Vera by the Office of Justice Programs in the U.S. Department of Justice. Over the next 18 months, Vera will create a web site to act as an information clearinghouse and center of a community of practice, providing access to rigorous examinations of the benefits and costs of policy choices.

As part of the Knowledge Bank project, CBAU will also facilitate roundtable discussions on criminal justice and cost-benefit analysis with policymakers, practitioners, and cost-benefit experts; will develop a toolkit of cost-benefit analytical instruments; and will provide general education and training on cost-benefit analysis, including webinars and podcasts.

Vera established its Cost-Benefit Analysis Unit in response to the growing need for cost-benefit capacity in the criminal justice field. In addition to building the Knowledge Bank, CBAU performs cost-benefit analyses and other cost-related studies, provides assistance to jurisdictions conducting their own studies, and carries out research to advance the knowledge and application of cost-benefit analysis in the justice system. CBAU will release its first cost-benefit analysis report this fall, supported by a series of educational podcasts explaining Vera’s approach to cost-benefit analysis.

The Vera Institute of Justice is an independent, non-partisan, nonprofit center for justice policy and practice. Vera combines expertise in research, demonstration projects, and technical assistance to help leaders in government and civil society improve the systems people rely on for justice and safety.

Listen to a podcast about Vera's Cost-Benefit Analysis Unit.

 

Friday, October 16, 2009 at 9:47 AM

OJJDP Bulletin Reports on Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence

 

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) has published "Children's Exposure to Violence: A Comprehensive National Survey."

Understanding the nature and extent of children's exposure to violence is essential to mitigating its effects. To this end, OJJDP, with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, sponsored the National Survey of Children's Exposure to Violence, whose findings are reported in this bulletin, the first in a series.

The survey, the first to measure children's exposure to violence in homes, schools, and communities across all age groups, found that more than 60 percent of the children surveyed were exposed to violence within the past year, either directly or indirectly (e.g., as a witness to a violent act; by learning of a violent act against a family member, neighbor, or close friend; or from a threat against their home or school).

Resources:

"Children's Exposure to Violence: A Comprehensive National Survey" (NCJ 227744) is available at ojjdp.ncjrs.gov/publications/PubAbstract.asp?pubi=249751.

Wednesday, October 07, 2009 at 9:49 AM

Capitol Hill Forum Will Feature Tribal Youth Program Report

 

On October 23, 2009, in Washington, DC, the American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) will host a forum on OJJDP's Tribal Youth Program, which provides funds to federally recognized American Indian tribes to support and enhance tribal efforts to prevent delinquency and improve the juvenile justice system for American Indian and Alaska Native youth ages 10-17.

Tribal Youth Program: Empowering Youth in Indian Country will showcase the release of the joint AYPF and OJJDP report "Strengthening Indian Country Through Tribal Youth Programs."

The report examines how the Tribal Youth Program is improving the lives of youth and strengthening families via case studies of five program sites. Speakers will include OJJDP staff and tribal officials.

Resources:

For further information about this forum, visit www.aypf.org/forumbriefs/2009/fb10230 9.htm.

Wednesday, October 07, 2009 at 9:31 AM